What I’ve Been Reading – 2017 Books Read Spreadsheet

Back at the start of 2015, annoyed with the fact that I couldn't track rereads on Goodreads, I started keeping a spreadsheet on Google Docs of the books I was reading. I did it partly out of curiosity, exactly how many books was I reading in a year? I hadn't known since middle school, when … Continue reading What I’ve Been Reading – 2017 Books Read Spreadsheet

On the Medicinal Benefits of Kittens

https://www.facebook.com/joahy03/videos/1760910693949420/   There's no denying that the news has been an unending stream of awful this year. Working in social media I don't really have the option to unplug, so I've been combatting the awful by increasing the ammount of kitten content in my personal streams.  I've found adding kittens to be immensly helpful. Especially … Continue reading On the Medicinal Benefits of Kittens

Writer’s Tools – Always have something to write with.

One of the best pieces of advice I've ever gotten was if you want to get good at something, Keep your tools with you all the time. A writer should never be without something to write with. A photographer should always have a camera. A musician should keep their instrument close and so on. While this is probably easier for a flute player than a cellist, it should be even easier for a writer. All you need is a pen or pencil and a small notebook. Or even just your phone (I wrote the draft of this on Google Docs on my phone on the subway).

Writer’s Tools – Write or Die

A grab you by the seat of your pants timed writing app that is great for getting words down, just be sure to revise what you’ve written. Screeching Violins and screaming babies a bonus. Splurge for the paid version for even more options and incentives, plus the ability to backup your timed writings so you never lose a word.

X-ray Origins – The Art of X-Ray Reading

Roy Peter Clark’s The Art of X-ray Reading: How the Secrets of 25 Great Works of Literature will Improve your Writing was the other direct inspiration for this blog and probably actually better at explaining how to learn from a text than Science Fiction 101 ever was. I’m borrowing pretty heavily from his terminology so far so it’s only fair that I write about how I’m doing that before we go much further.

Writer’s Tools – Goodreads

I know what you’re thinking. Emily, isn’t Goodreads a site for readers? And you’re right. But good readers make good writers. It is hard to write without having read extensively. And it is hard to read extensively to good purpose without keeping track of things. Which is why I’m arguing that Goodreads is a tool for writers, even more than readers.

A Place to Start – Science Fiction 101

When I was about thirteen, I discovered in the depths of a Vroman's bargin bin a thick* book with the title: Science Fiction 101. Well that’s clearly a book meant for me, I thought. I had only recently decided that writing was something I'd like to do and this book came with the byline "where to start reading and writing science fiction." Perfect.

Opening the Writer’s Toolshed

Spend enough time bouncing around writing forums and reading writer's manuals and you will start encountering a lot of the same advice. One of the biggies - at least for me - has been the suggestion that writers learn best by dissecting writing they admire. It works on the principal that a beginning writer's taste is already good but their execution still sucks. By breaking down and imitating writitng that they find good, new writers find the building blocks of good writing for themselves and therefore incorporate it into their own writing.